Posts tagged ‘fiction’

April 17, 2014

Jack Reacher Books in Order

Not knowing what order to read a book series in is a unique annoyance, one which I would prefer to spare my fellow man. So, as a courtesy to the public, I am occasionally listing some excellent series with unambiguous order. This is Round 5. [You may also be interested in Round 4 (Lord Peter Wimsey), Round 3 (Lady Julia Grey, Lady Emily, and Miss Dido Kent books), Round 2 (Marcus Didius Falco), and Round 1 (Harry Bosch).]

  1. Killing Floor
  2. Die Trying
  3. Tripwire
  4. Running Blind/The Visitor
  5. Echo Burning
  6. Without Fail
  7. Persuader
  8. The Enemy
  9. One Shot
  10. The Hard Way
  11. Bad Luck & Trouble
  12. Nothing to Lose
  13. Gone Tomorrow
  14. 61 Hours
  15. Worth Dying For
  16. The Affair
  17. A Wanted Man
  18. Never Go Back
  19. Personal (due out September 2014)
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January 13, 2014

Love is holy because it is like grace – the worthiness of its object is never really what matters.

Marilynne Robinson, Gilead, 209

September 22, 2012

Convalescent Reading List

Here’s what’ve I’ve read in the last 3ish months. It turns out I’m a grumpier reader when I’m sick, which means I give up on books more quickly. For example, this quarter (did not mean for it to get this long, sorry), I gave up on Eliza Haywood’s Love in Excess. It was slow and the guy was a complete jerk and she kept trying to get me to like him and I finally said, “You know what? I don’t have to read this!”

As for the rest, this time I’ve added some notes, but I should start by saying that Lisa Gardner and Michael Connelly write some fabulous mysteries. I prefer Gardner’s current D.D. Warren series, but I’m doubling back to catch her FBI Profiler series now as well.

Oh, and I’ve bolded my favorites.

  1.  The Italian by Ann Radcliffe – deliciously all things Gothic, complete with swooning and convents
  2. Nothing to Hide by Mark Bertrand – absolutely love this guy and everything he puts out
  3. Echo Park by Michael Connelly
  4. The Overlook by Michael Connelly
  5. Three Tales of My Father’s Dragon by Ruth Gannett Stiles
  6. Bloodlines: Race, Cross, and the Christian by John Piper – This book isn’t revolutionary except for the fact that it’s TRUE. Racism is evil. Let’s kill it dead. 
  7. A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith – so sad!
  8. The Pretty One by Cheryl Klam
  9. Where We Belong by Emily Giffin – she just keeps getting better, although my favorite is still Baby Proof
  10. The Cookbook Collector by Allegra Goodman – very interesting 
  11. The Complete Sherlock Holmes by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (Finally finished the whole thing!) 
  12. Girls in White Dresses by Jennifer Close
  13. The Perfect Husband by Lisa Gardner
  14. The Other Daughter by Lisa Gardner
  15. The Nine Tailors by Dorothy Sayers
  16. The Calico Captive by Elizabeth George Speare – so racist! I never realized as a kid.
  17. The Girl Who Chased the Moon by Sarah Addison Allen – really cute
  18. The Technologists by Matthew Pearl – fascinating. get wrapped up in medium-old Boston for a little while. 
  19. The Unwritten: Tommy Taylor and the Bogus Identity by Mike Carey and Peter Gross
  20. The Unwritten: Inside Man by Mike Carey and Peter Gross
  21. The Great Divide by T. Davis Bunn – a legal novel about  attacking human trafficking
  22. The Third Victim by Lisa Gardner
  23. Black Orchid by Neil Gaiman and David McKean
  24. The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern – absolutely enchanting; very clever 
  25. World War Z by Max Brooks – zombie war is over; oral history is compiled. very cool.
  26. The Last Oracle by James Rollins
  27. Obama’s America: Unmaking the American Dream by Dinesh D’Souza – investigation of the president’s ideological base
  28. The Knight at Dawn (Magic Tree House #2) by Mary Pope Osborne- if i can extrapolate from this book, i’d say that the Magic Tree House books are a fine way to familiarize kids with other times and cultures, but a TERRIBLE way to teach them to take notes. HORRIBLE. REALLY.
  29. Words Unspoken by Elizabeth Musser – a story of healing after tremendous loss
  30. Fables: 1001 Nights of Snowfall by Bill Williamson and a host of illustrators

If you know much about about popular literature, you’ll probably see this list and pick out a bunch of what my 3rd grade teacher called “candy bar books” – basically junk food books. I am immensely grateful for them. Right now, they are easy for me to understand where lots of other books take more energy. Plus, they are fun. And I read fast.

May 10, 2012

The fact is, the king was a good deal more than a king, he was a man; and when a man is a man, you can’t knock it out of him.

– Mark Twain, A  Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court